Book Review- Brain Jack by Brian Falkner

The computer age is here, with our every keystroke we blaze a trail that anyone can follow.  But what if we didn’t have to type in our thoughts, what if we could just connect up to the computer interface with our mind.  Imagine how much faster we could be, how we could form some type of collective consciousness to better the world.  That is the premise of Brain Jack.

Sam Wilson is a computer super geek.  He delights in the challenge of hacking into systems, moving around unnoticed then leaving without anyone the wiser.  Sam thinks he is invulnerable until the day the government catches up with him after he causes the biggest Internet crash the world has seen.  Instead of locking him up and throwing away the key the government offers him the chance to use his abilities to aid the world.  But as good as the team he has hooked up with is they can’t stop the cyber attacks that have begun to cripple the Internet.  So, they must turn to the latest technology of neural headsets to use thoughts to combat the cyber-terrorists.  Only it gets worse, people start to die and society starts to fall apart.

This story is incredibly fast-paced; I found it hard to put the book down.  I have recommended it to others who have also had the same reaction.  This story is a  War Games (MGM,1983) for a new generation.  There are a few faults I found with the story but on the whole I enjoyed it.  I have to admit that I found the idea of Las Vegas being nuked into oblivion inspired; I also liked the concept of gaming addiction taken to such an alarming degree. Both of those ideas make this work thought provoking for the readers.

I really enjoyed the story and could easily see this as a movie.  I recommend this book to any one from pre-teens on through adults who love a good story that can carry you away from your every day life.  This is a great summer read!

Age Range: Pre-teens on up.

Brain Jack by Brian Falkner. Ember . Reprint edition 2011.  368pp.

 

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